What Type of Eyeglasses are Right for You?

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EyeQue Team

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September 2, 2021

Depending on how you use your vision on a daily basis, certain types of glasses may be better suited to your needs. Read below to learn more about the different types of glasses available and see which one may be best for you.

Single Vision Glasses

The most common glasses type is called “single vision” because it is designed for one viewing distance, whether that is for distance, intermediate (such as computer), or near. There is only one lens power throughout the whole lens. Based on the prescription, the lens power can correct for nearsightedness (myopia), farsightedness (hyperopia), and astigmatism. Over-the-counter reading glasses such as those found in drugstores are a type of single vision glasses. However, they do NOT correct for nearsightedness and astigmatism.

 

Single Vision

Designed for one viewing distance, whether that is for distance, intermediate (such as computer), or near.

 

Pros of Single Vision Glasses

  1. Widest field of vision since the whole lens is the same prescription.
  2. Easiest lens type for your eyes to adjust to compared to progressives or bifocals.
  3. Most affordable option.
  4. Inexpensive reading glasses are available without a prescription at retail stores.

Cons of Single Vision Glasses

  1. Not multi-purpose; can’t correct for multiple viewing distances if you need a different prescription for distance and near vision.
  2. Over-the-counter reading glasses don’t correct for nearsightedness (myopia), astigmatism, or different powers needed for each eye.

If you simply want eyeglasses to correct your blurry vision, then EyeQue has a solution for you. VisionCheck is a smartphone-compatible device that measures your refractive error, and then you can use the results to order glasses online!

Progressives

Progressives correct for three viewing distances: distance, intermediate, and near. The power “progressively” changes like a gradient in your lenses, with the distance portion on top and near portion on the bottom. If your glasses prescription has an “Add” listed on it, it means you need a different power to help you focus on shorter reading distances. These kinds of glasses can be made as progressives, bifocals, or reading glasses. An “Add” is the “additional” lens power needed on top of your distance prescription to see up close.

There are different types of progressives:

  1. Standard progressives correct for three viewing distances: distance, intermediate, and near. They serve as an all-in-one pair of glasses for everyday wear.
  2.  

    Standard Progressives

    Designed for three viewing distances: distance, intermediate, and near. They serve as an all-in-one pair of glasses for everyday wear.

     

  3. Workspace progressives correct for two viewing distances: intermediate and near. They’re specialized for up-close activities at work or home. There are two types of workspace progressives: mid-range and near-range. Mid-range workspace progressives enhance the field of vision for intermediate work, while near-range workspace progressives enhance the field of vision for near work. Workspace progressives don’t correct for distance, so they’re not recommended for driving.

 

Workspace Progressives

 

Mid-Range Progressives

 

 

Near-Range Progressives

 

Workspace progressives correct for two viewing distances: intermediate and near. They’re specialized for up-close activities at work or home.

 

Pros of Progressives

  1. Standard progressives can be your all-in-one pair of glasses for everyday wear if you have multiple prescriptions for distance and near vision.

Cons of Progressives

  1. Takes more time to adapt to the gradient lens design, around 2-3 weeks for new wearers. Vision may seem distorted at first.
  2. The field of view for each distance may not be very large since the lens has to be divided up into different powers.
  3. Most expensive option compared with single vision glasses and bifocals.

Bifocals

Bifocals correct for two viewing distances, typically a distance portion on top and a near portion on the bottom. The two viewing areas are divided by a visible line. Some people also may opt for workspace bifocals, which correct for intermediate and near vision instead of distance and near vision.

 

Bifocals

Correct for two viewing distances, typically a distance portion on top and a near portion on the bottom. The two viewing areas are divided by a visible line.

 

Pros of Bifocals

  1. Corrects for more than one viewing distance if you have multiple prescriptions for distance and near.
  2. Compared with progressives as a multi-prescription glasses, bifocals are more affordable.
  3. Compared with progressives as a multi-prescription glasses, bifocals are easier to adjust to.

Cons of Bifocals

  1. Has a visible line on the lenses.
  2. Only corrects for two viewing distances instead of three like progressives.

With the right knowledge, you can choose the glasses that work best for you. Many people opt for multiple pairs of glasses depending on their daily needs and hobbies.

If you would like to speak with a professional about what glasses type may be best for you, contact our support team or your optometrist for more information.

If you need a prescription, we encourage you to visit your usual eye doctor or request one from EyeCare Live.

Your Vision at Your Fingertips

With the VisionCheck you can test your vision from home and use the results to order glasses online. Updating your glasses has never been easier!

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